How Scientists Can Slow Down Time

If the prospect of old age frightens you, then maybe you should consider piloting aircraft for a living. The connection might not seem so obvious at first, but according to the principle of time dilation, the faster you move, the slower the experience of time relative to your unmoving counterparts. And relative to people on the ground, people flying on airplanes move much faster and must experience the passage of time more slowly. In the ‘70s, this theory was tested using clocks on aircraft, and more recently a German study was able to replicate the experience of time dilation in a lab. Maybe pilots don’t actually stave off old age for good, but the physics behind the principle are nevertheless important to make sure that technologies like GPS satellites work properly.

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Are You a Supertaster?

The acuteness of our sense of taste is to our evolutionary advantage, to direct us to foods of high nutritional value and to help us steer clear of foods that might sicken or even poison us. The science of taste is today so much more complicated than simply a question of sour or sweet, bitter or salty. Umami, calcium, kokumi, even metallicity—among others—are just a few of the newly recognized tastes that have entered into the discussion. A super-taster can have up to twice as many taste buds as the average person, making for a much richer dining experience given the presence of all of these tastes to explore. But the reality is that super-tasting often makes for picky eaters.

Image from: Wikimedia.

Taste is so much more complicated than sweet, sour, salty, and bitter. Image from: Wikimedia.

For more, read the following article from The National Geographic:

http://theplate.nationalgeographic.com/2014/09/30/are-you-a-supertaster/

Do I Only Use 10% of My Brain?

While we might only be realizing a fraction of our potential, this does not mean that we only use 10% of our brains. Our body’s automatic functions (like breathing) or some of our actions that don’t take very much thought at all (like walking) all rely on the brain. We know this because of technological innovations like MRI’s that give us a greater understand of how—and how much—of the brain actively functions, technologies that have only become available since long after the advent of this myth. So the next time we are tempted to repeat the old adage, maybe we should instead opt to say what it is we really mean—that we have tremendous untapped potential, regardless of the percentage of our brains that we do or do not use.

For more on the science of brains, check out the segment from SciShow included below:

Kickstarter in Europe

Kickstarter is a popular crowd-funding website, a platform where artists, inventors, and innovators of all kinds can fundraise for just about any project imaginable, taking donations from as small $1 to as large as contributors are generous enough to offer. Investors are often just everyday people with an interest in the prospective creation, people who are often rewarded with perks in exchange for donations. The best part is that the website is about so much more than raising money. Through Kickstarter, creators can begin to develop the basis for a community to engage with and enjoy the project even when it is still in its planning stages.

And now Kickstarter is coming to continental Europe.

Kickstarter, which already had a basis in the U.S., U.K., Ireland, N.Z., and Australia, recently began broaching Europe by opening up its website to the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, and Norway. The goal is to “become available to more European countries,” a heads-up for any European creators who might be interested in investing some time in using Kickstarter’s services.

File:Kickstarter logo.png

Kickstarter is a popular crowd-funding website that has recently expanded into Europe. Image from: Wikimedia.

For more information, take a look at the Kickstarter website here (https://www.kickstarter.com/learn?ref=nav) or the following article reporting on the expansion here (http://tech.eu/news/crowdfunding-kickstarter-netherlands-europe/).

A Look at 10/10/1877: Custer’s Last Stand and the Making of a Legend

On October 10th 1877, an entire year after his death, one of the most controversial figures of nineteenth-century American history was finally put to rest. Though today his story has become legend, in his own lifetime General Custer was something of an enigma. For the remainder of her life, Elizabeth Bacon Custer would adamantly defend her husband’s actions on and off the battlefield. His story was latched onto by the media and re-spun as a further incentive to perpetuate the violence against Native Americans. A hero was born, not out of his own actions, but the actions of others to memorialize his death.

Image from: Wikimedia

“The Custer Fight” by Charles Marion Russell. Image from: Wikimedia.

Custer rose to military prominence during the Civil War as an extraordinarily young and gifted officer. Yet it is not for these military escapades that he is remembered, but rather for his involvement in battles against the Sioux and Cheyenne in what is today the northwestern United States. Custer represents a picture of the West as conquest.

His Last Stand at the Battle of Little Big Horn is a highly romanticized image, a portrait of grown men playing at Cowboys-and-Indians that was once blown up into posters and hung around bars. When the actual conflict was long forgotten, what remained in place was the image. It took at least a year between his death and his funeral to plant the seeds that put the image in place.

Today is a reminder that the stories we tell ourselves have enormous power. We make our own heroes and decide their legacies long after they are gone and no longer have a say in how they are to be remembered—as tragic figures printed on the walls of bars or participants in a more complicated reality. Words are not passive reflections of the past, but rather active creators of our collective memory.

Sources:

Custer’s Last Stand, a PBS Documentary (http://video.pbs.org/video/2186572157/)

Custer’s Funeral is Held at West Point (http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/custers-funeral-is-held-at-west-point)

A Look at 10/6/1889: On Moving Pictures and “Talkies”

Image from: Wikimedia

Original poster advertising the groundbreaking talkie. Image from: Wikimedia.

October 6th is a celebration for film buffs everywhere. The first motion picture and the heralding out of the silent movie era share an unlikely anniversary, thirty-eight years apart.

Wait a minute, wait a minute. You ain’t heard nothin’ yet. Wait a minute I tell ya, you ain’t heard nothin’. You want to hear ‘Toot, Toot, Tootsie’?” says actor Al Jolson from behind the movie screen, effectively ushering in a new age of “talkies” or films with sound. The 1927 film opens up with an orchestral sequence, much like the other silent films of the time. But Al Jolson’s words break the pattern, interrupt the music. No, the mainstream cinema “ain’t heard nothin’ yet,” nothing like this anyway.

Except, it sort of already had.

In 1889, Thomas Edison played a motion picture in his laboratory in New Jersey. He had invented the motion picture, experimenting with an idea that if you capture enough pictures and move them in sequence fast enough, the image effectively moves. The first time he tried this out, today so many years ago, he synchronized the moving picture with audio coming from a phonograph. The first moving picture spoke, but it would take another thirty some-odd years for the advent of sound in cinema to catch on.

The role of the film The Jazz Singer was to do just that. Boasting an award-winning cast, the film marks an almost tangible transition from the before-sound and after-sound era. Its opening and subsequent musical themes are a testament to the shift. A major theme in the plot is a shift in cultural values that was very much on the minds of people during the Roaring 20s. Where do old world values end and the values of a new world—a world that produces a whole new sort of music, a whole new sort of sound—begin? And what better way to illustrate that than through technological advancements that allow for expression of that sound? Unsurprisingly, the film was a huge success.

But being grounded in the present day, I find that there are moments when watching the film becomes difficult—not because our musical tastes have changed so drastically in the last century or because the father’s death scene is so heart-wrenching, but rather because of other expressions of themes that are deeply problematic in the present day. The titular jazz performer wears blackface, and Jewish traditions are arguably othered, first by the assimilating protagonist, and then by the gaze of an audience who consumes the spectacle. In watching the film today, we watch us watch ourselves struggle with basic ideas about unity and diversity and integration, ideas that are not irrelevant today and that will never be irrelevant.

Thomas Edison and The Jazz Singer gave us the tremendous power of sound in film. Now it is time for us to truly listen.

Sources:

From the Library of Congress (http://goo.gl/G1Zpx9http://goo.gl/S8N6Py)

From the Charles Edison Fund (http://goo.gl/JvcNpU)

From the American Film Institute (http://goo.gl/qtUnbO)

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