Global Climate Change | by NASA

http://climate.nasa.gov/

Global Climate Change | by NASA

Global Climate Change | by NASA

While global change and climate change are two terms often used interchangeably, global change encompasses broader changes to all aspects of our world including areas such as the availability of water resources, sea-level rise, ocean acidification, and biodiversity; and Climate change is used to emphasize the specific changes most commonly associated with the atmosphere and the “average weather,” including temperature, humidity, cloudiness, or precipitation changes. NASA’s climate change website includes impressive graphics and simulations like the “Eyes on the Earth 3D,” the “climate time machine,” the “orbiting outpost” with images from the International Space Station (ISS) over the last 10 years, and several other goodies. There is a kids website, videos, photos, quizzes, and an educator’s section with tips and tricks to use when teaching the subject.

The site’s extensive coverage is quite impressive, many parts of it we could have featured by themselves.

(part of description from NASA’s Global Climate Change website)

Watch the video below explaining the effects of temperature change on the planet:

The past decade has been the hottest ever recorded since global temperature records began 150 years ago. This video discusses the impacts of the sun’s energy, Earth’s reflectance and greenhouse gasses on global warming. (Credit: NASA)

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The Ocean Portal | by the Smithsonian Institution

http://ocean.si.edu/

Ocean Portal

Ocean Portal

The Ocean is important to all life, including yours.  The Ocean Portal is a unique, interactive online experience that inspires awareness, understanding, and stewardship of the world’s Ocean, developed by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History and more than 20 collaborating organizations.  The Ocean Portal is the third pillar of the Smithsonian Institution’s Ocean Initiative and builds upon the momentum of the National Museum of Natural History’s Sant Ocean Hall and appointment of the Sant Marine Science Chair. These pillars were developed to hold up the Smithsonian’s mission to increase the public’s Ocean understanding and stewardship. Throughout the site, check out ‘For Educators’ on the left side of the page. There you will find lesson plans, activities, and resources related to the page topic.

(part of description from the Ocean Portal website)

A Rainbow of Crocheted Corals

A Rainbow of Crocheted Corals

Energy Kids

http://www.eia.gov/kids/

Energy Kids

Energy Kids

This website designed for kids by the U.S. Energy Information Administration is full of information about energy; from energy basics to forms of energy, and from using to conserving. Visitors can go on virtual field trips across the U.S. with Energy Ant through engaging photo journals, and teachers can find lesson plans, guides, links, and suggested ways of using the website in the classroom.

Learn about the definition of energy, the forms that it comes in, and the difference between renewable and nonrenewable sources.  The site describes different forms of energy, units used to measure it, how we can save Energy.  There is also a collection of educational online games that help students learn about the subject.

(part of description from exploratorium and Energy Kids website)

 

Yosemite in HD

Ok, so this is not really a link, but the high definition timelapse video of Yosemite was really impressive.

Found through Gizmodo (http://gizmodo.com/5878252/remind-yourself-how-beautiful-nature-is-by-watching-this-stunning-yosemite-timelapse), it shows how breathtaking nature can be.

This video is a collaboration between Sheldon Neill and Colin Delehanty. More details about the video are available through the video’s page on vimeo.

energy.gov

http://energy.gov/

Energy.gov

Energy.gov

Whether you want to read about how electric vehicles work and what they’re doing to improve fuel efficiency, reduce emissions, and lower maintenance costs, or how physicists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are using a device called a “snowflake divertor” to solve one of the grand challenges of magnetic fusion, you can check out energy.gov to get the latest on these issues from the U.S. Department of Energy.

The site includes sub-sections on Biological Science, Chemical Science, Computing, Environmental Science, Materials Science, Physics, a “child” website with maps and data, a news blog, and a site on Energy Innovation.

Watch a video below on electric vehicles:

Web of Stories

http://www.webofstories.com/

Web of Stories is a place where you can  record your own stories and watch stories that others have recorded.  A good place to start is by checking out the Channels section. All the stories are grouped by subject into Channels – Science, A Day in the Life, Film etc. When you watch a story, you will also see a list of “Related Stories” on the screen, inviting you to listen further.

Lives is the Web of Stories flagship channel. It is where you can watch the stories of people who have influenced the world or who have simply led exciting and interesting lives. Listen to the stories of great scientists, doctors, artists, film makers and other notable people and learn something new today. Check out the “Channels” section to view a long list of themes for the videos posted.

You can also Record your own story and post it on the website.  What would you need to do to post a story in Web of Stories? Simply tell your story, speaking to the camera. In order to record your stories, check the site for more information and follow the instructions.

We have included a video below about the first picture of the surface of the moon, by Bernard Lovell

(part of description from Web of Stories website – found through Mary Laine’s Neat New Stuff website)

GDS International Infographics

http://gdsinternational.tumblr.com/

GDS International Infographics

GDS International Infographics

We admit it. We like infographics.  They allow us to better understand and analyze a complex situation or problem.  This site features the article along with the infographic, which are mainly in the industrial and business domains.  However, many of the infographics, as well as the articles could be of interest to anyone, like the one featuring password strength, a couple on the spread of diseases around the globe, on the G2o debt, etc.

It appears that the site has not been updated recently, but there is still plenty of useful material there.

Below is an infographic on password security, you may want to look at it before choosing your  next password:

How secure is your password?

How secure is your password?

ScienceBlogs

http://scienceblogs.com/

ScienceBlogs

ScienceBlogs

Much more than just a collection of science blogs. According to the description on the site: “From climate change to intelligent design, HIV/AIDS to stem cells, science education to space exploration, science is figuring prominently in our discussions of politics, religion, philosophy, business and the arts. New insights and discoveries in neuroscience, theoretical physics and genetics are revolutionizing our understanding of who are, where we come from and where we’re heading. Launched in January 2006, ScienceBlogs is a portal to this global dialogue, a digital science salon featuring the leading bloggers from a wide array of scientific disciplines. [According to the site,] today, ScienceBlogs is the largest online community dedicated to science.

[The site editors] believe in providing our bloggers with the freedom to exercise their own editorial and creative instincts. [They] do not edit their work and we do not tell them what to write about.

[The editors] have selected  80+ bloggers based on their originality, insight, talent, and dedication and how [they] think they would contribute to the discussion at ScienceBlogs. [Their] role, as [they] see it, is to create and continue to improve this forum for discussion, and to ensure that the rich dialogue that takes place at ScienceBlogs resonates outside the blogosphere.”

(part of description from ScienceBlogs website –  found through Mary Laine’s Neat New Stuff website)

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